What Canadians are Saying

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To inform the development of the national strategy for the 2030 Agenda, a first round of public consultations was held from March to May 2019. Through this process, thousands of Canadians expressed their commitment to the 2030 Agenda and their desire to see coordinated and inclusive action toward achieving the SDGs across the country.


To inform the development of the national strategy for the 2030 Agenda, a first round of public consultations was held from March to May 2019. Through this process, thousands of Canadians expressed their commitment to the 2030 Agenda and their desire to see coordinated and inclusive action toward achieving the SDGs across the country.

Guest Book

Several organizations across the country are already using the SDGs to frame, monitor and report on their social impact and many more are currently exploring ways to contribute further to the SDGs. Nevertheless, it is clear that many organizations had not heard of the SDGs; they were unaware of how they can contribute and of the extent to which they were already contributing. There was a noticeable need for greater awareness and engagement across all sectors.

The private sector in Canada is starting to look beyond traditional corporate responsibilities to implement innovative business models that generate social and environmental value in a sustainable way. Stakeholders also expressed their need to understand the business case for SDGs, and to develop opportunities for businesses, especially small- and medium-sized ones, to work more closely on the SDGs with civil society organizations and governments.

A number of academic institutions in Canada are taking a leadership role in advancing sustainable development across the country. Along with a rise in sustainable development research, some institutions are aligning the direction of their strategic research with the SDGs. Many academic institutions are pursuing engagement activities and developing curriculums that empower students to make informed decisions in favour of sustainable development.

Although many academic institutions have not yet integrated the SDGs into their mandates, they recognize the value of the SDGs, and consequently, are beginning to pursue options to contribute to them. We heard that an opportunity exists to continue building awareness, engagement and partnerships through education networks and by building on the best practices and successes of institutions already taking action to advance progress on the SDGs.

Direct engagement with youth has shown that they are unwavering in their determination and desire to help build a better future. They require more tools, greater awareness of the opportunities to get involved and further support to sit at decision-making tables. While youth are often strong advocates for a more sustainable future and many are taking action to make this a reality many other youth feel far removed from influencing progress on the 2030 Agenda and designing a strategy that takes into consideration their unique perspectives. Young people are looking for better access to the planning process in order to help define success for Canada’s future generations.

Canadians were clear that the SDGs cannot be implemented in silos. Achieving the SDGs requires leadership at all levels, including the federal government, the provinces and territories, municipalities and national Indigenous organizations. Stakeholders, particularly from civil society, underscored the fact that action needs to be community-driven and supported by efforts to enable local contributions to sustainable development.

Many stakeholders made a link between Canada’s domestic efforts and its international efforts to advance progress on the SDGs. They acknowledged that Canadian investments in developing countries were driving progress and that, between local and global efforts, mutual learning can and should occur.

Leaving no one behind was seen as vital to the successful implementation of the 2030 Agenda in Canada. Stakeholders indicated the need for a collective and concerted effort to engage directly with historically marginalized groups, including women, Indigenous peoples, newcomers, persons with disabilities, seniors, members of the LGBTQ2 community and youth in order to support their unique needs and contributions. Many communities expressed their willingness to engage locally with familiar, trusted organizations working on issues that involve them directly.

Conversations were initiated with Indigenous partners, and linkages between the 2030 Agenda and reconciliation were clear. This initial engagement pointed to the fact that Canada’s national strategy must reaffirm its commitment to reconciliation with the Indigenous peoples and consider their culturally diverse population, their unique knowledge of the land and the distinct challenges many First Nations, Inuit and Métis communities face.

Stakeholders stated that the national strategy should also rely on high-quality disaggregated data to accurately assess progress and identify the key areas in which action is needed. We heard that systematic gaps in data pose a problem, especially in many smaller and remote communities. Regular, transparent and timely reporting is considered a necessity to track progress and ensure accountability.

Overall, stakeholders across the sectors noted that to successfully move the 2030 Agenda forward in Canada, we need to build awareness, foster engagement and forge partnerships. They also felt that the SDGs must be accessible and meaningful to Canadians.

Share your comments on Canada's implementation of the 2030 Agenda below.

CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.

Do you have a list of the institutions/stakeholders already involved in your program and the activities, and where can I find the information?

Jim 11 months ago
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Help! I am siloed in Brantford Ontario. Please, what academic institutions have you approached. We are senior civil society watching provincial, antiquated systems self-destruct. We MUST teach our children to use SDG's to compete globally. NOW

Carey 12 months ago
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